Talks + Events

Recital: The Plurality of Existence in the Infinite Expanse of Space and Time

26 November 2017

Sunday 26 November 2017 | 1pm
Free admission, all welcome.

Artist Clodagh Emoe will introduce writers Marie Claire Mundi Njong, Jean-Marie Rukundo Phillemonand and Saida Umar who will recite their poems from the book The Plurality of Existence in the Infinite Expanse of Space and Time, as part of Dublin Art Book Fair: Art and Architecture Interwoven, sponsored by Henry J Lyons.

The Plurality of Existence in the Infinite Expanse of Space and Time is an anthology of poetry that has unfolded out of a collaborative art project between artist Clodagh Emoe and Crocosmia; a group of writers seeking asylum, many living within the system of direct provision in Ireland. This anthology that includes poems by Siniša Končić, Annet Mphahlele, Marie Claire Mundi Njong, Jean-Marie Rukundo Phillemon, Peter Rukundo and Saida Umar, marks the culmination of a series of site-specific audio works that were transmitted on the Liffey, the Lee, the Barrow and the Corrib. The book designed by John Sherwin includes a preface by Dr. Clodagh Emoe and an essay by Prof. Briget Anderson (Oxford). This project was supported by the Arts Council Project Award and Dublin City Council Community and Neighbourhood Award.

“Art as an expression of oppression involves taking risks. I applaud writers Siniša Končić, Annet Mphahlele, Marie Claire Mundi Njong, Jean-Marie Rukundo Phillemon, Peter Rukundo and Saida Umar who have shared their experiences evoking memories of home and place. They remind us of our shared humanity, they help to connect us to each of them by inviting us into their lives. They are visible, they are political and they are powerful.”
Edel McGinley, Director, Migrant Rights Centre Ireland

“Together with the excellent Clodagh Emoe, Crocosmia have developed a unique artwork which manages to be both site-specific and fluid, the stories adapting themselves to each new place the poems have been transmitted. These poems have an imaginative power which becomes somehow visceral through their layering on to Irish settings. We are invited to linger by the Corrib River and listen to a man speaking of another river, the Danube, at a time of war. When we hear " How does the lilac smell there?", we can almost smell the scent ourselves and feel what it might be like when the familiar become unfamiliar - when a city is made strange by conflict. These poems give insight into what it is to exist in two places simultaneously, a feeling deeply understood by many migrants."
Senator Alice Mary Higgins

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